Info

Faces of Azua and Nizao

In the Dominican Republic, many children dream of becoming Major League Baseball
players. In two of these modest towns-Azua, home of the Texas Rangers closer and
Rookie of the Year, Neftali Feliz and Nizao where a training facility is located-things
are no different. Children from these towns have motivations and face challenges that
are unique to these poor children. While American children grow up being supported
by their parents in their pursuit of baseball greatness, Dominican children grow up with
hopes of one day supporting their families with the fortunes promised by baseball.

American children play in a regimented structure of summer, high school, and
college teams with a known path to professional baseball-the draft. Their Dominican
counterparts don't have the luxury of these systems. They can only hope that some
foreigner will discover and sign them as free agents. Not only are these players far less
visible than their American counterparts, being ineligible for the draft, but have very little
to gauge what a fair value for their contract is.

American agencies like CSM, with Greg Maroni and Carlos Paulino are helping even the
odds. They provide training, equipment, and guidance to these young players. Not only
are these players given the tools to become the best players that they can be, but their
visibility is also increased, thereby enhancing their chance for success in professional
baseball. Their faces tell the story of their hard work. Their hopes and dreams can be
seen in their eyes.

Add to Cart Add to Lightbox Download
Filename
Faces of Azua and Nizao 088.TIF
Copyright
Juan Ayora
Image Size
5120x3401 / 27.9MB
Contained in galleries
In the Dominican Republic, many children dream of becoming Major League Baseball<br />
players. In two of these modest towns-Azua, home of the Texas Rangers closer and<br />
Rookie of the Year, Neftali Feliz and Nizao where a training facility is located-things<br />
are no different. Children from these towns have motivations and face challenges that<br />
are unique to these poor children. While American children grow up being supported<br />
by their parents in their pursuit of baseball greatness, Dominican children grow up with<br />
hopes of one day supporting their families with the fortunes promised by baseball.<br />
<br />
American children play in a regimented structure of summer, high school, and<br />
college teams with a known path to professional baseball-the draft. Their Dominican<br />
counterparts don't have the luxury of these systems. They can only hope that some<br />
foreigner will discover and sign them as free agents. Not only are these players far less<br />
visible than their American counterparts, being ineligible for the draft, but have very little<br />
to gauge what a fair value for their contract is.<br />
<br />
American agencies like CSM, with Greg Maroni and Carlos Paulino are helping even the<br />
odds. They provide training, equipment, and guidance to these young players. Not only<br />
are these players given the tools to become the best players that they can be, but their<br />
visibility is also increased, thereby enhancing their chance for success in professional<br />
baseball. Their faces tell the story of their hard work. Their hopes and dreams can be<br />
seen in their eyes.